Understanding Meme Culture

Surprised black and white baby cow in front of mountain forest landscape. Farming and animal husbandry concept. Copy space meme emotion background.

Meme culture is an enormous and diverse phenomenon.

It all started on the internet. Something like the swastika is often seen as a symbol of Christianity and many other religions. As is the use of two hands together forming the head of a snake as a sacred symbol for a religion.

People make jokes about the swastika without realizing that it has many religious connotations. The same can be said for two hands being intertwined. A dog biting its owner is thought to symbolize loyalty and respect. The same holds true for two heads being turned into a swastika form. Many religions have used this idea for centuries.

There are various different groups who take on the idea of taking what was previously a symbol of a religion and transforming it into their own. These people say they are doing it for the “spiritual” reason. The truth is that they are doing it for the money.

But What is Meme?

The term meme is a term that has been around for years. It is defined as “a unit of cultural transmission”. With this definition, I think we can see that a meme culture is nothing more than cultural transmission.

In order to understand why people would form a meme culture in the first place, you must understand how we perceive things on the internet. Our minds are wired to want to connect things on the internet that we like. The more we like something, the easier it becomes to connect it with our own ideas and ideals. Once a connection is made, it is very easy to make that connection repeatedly.

So in order to create a meme culture, you need to know some very specific details about a niche market. The information you provide should be a key point of interest for a group of people. For example, if you were trying to create a meme culture about Calvin and Hobbes, you need to understand a niche market for kids who are into Calvin and Hobbes comics.

When I say niche market, I am referring to Calvin and Hobbes being a comic book for young children. If you decided to make a meme culture about ice hockey, the topic would be completely different. You might consider a meme culture about ice hockey players, or a meme culture about someone wearing an NHL jersey.

The last thing I am going to talk about in this article is how to make a meme culture. The reality is that creating a meme culture is relatively easy. The hard part is keeping the culture going.

If you own a popular book or movie, you might want to keep a meme culture around it. This way, when it comes time to talk about the movie or book, you have a built in crowd. The only issue is keeping that culture alive.

For example, say you own a popular book, but that book is no longer on the bestseller list. You can easily make a meme culture around it. All you need to do is share the fact that you have that book.

For example, if you owned a popular book called “Hot Coffee” and that book was on the number one list, you could ask your friends, “hey I have that book again!” You could then make a meme culture around that book by telling stories about your connection to that book. This will help to create a community around the book, helping to keep the memory of the book alive.

A meme culture doesn’t have to be a culture at all. In order to really create a meme culture, you need to be able to look at something as a way to get to a group of people who share the same interests.